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NEW! COVID PROGRAMMING
...
THE ESSEX
FLOWERS
WINDOW BOX

NOW: KEVIN FORD

REMOTE VIEWING
 
TAKEOVERS +
STUDIO VIZ
INSTAGRAM

PAST


19 MONROE ST
NEW YORK, NY

INFO@ESSEXFLOWERS.US

The gallery is open Saturdays + Sundays 12 - 6 PM and by appointment.

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THE WINDOW BOX 

The Essex Flowers Window Box is a public-facing exhibition venue occupying our 19 Monroe Street storefront window. The enclosed vitrine allows us to stage gallery exhibitions while observing social distancing guidelines. The Window Box is viewable from the street 24 hours a day with frequently rotated shows that can be enjoyed by passersby and gallery goers alike. We invite you to stop by anytime and check out our programming for this new venue from the street while wearing a mask and practicing appropriate social distancing. More about each artists and each installation at essexflowers.us

Artists presented: Kevin Ford, Ander Mikalson, Barbara Smith, Sean McCarthy, Craig Taylor, Emily Mullin, Gerard Mullin, Sean McElroy (planned so far, stay tuned for more…)

NOW: KEVIN FORD


Kevin Ford, Birds, various dimensions, 2020


"...one never copies anything but the vision that remains of it at each moment, the image that becomes conscious. You never copy the glass on the table; you copy the residue of a vision... Each time I look at the glass, it seems to be remaking itself, that is to say, its reality becomes uncertain, because its projection in my head is uncertain, or partial. You see it as if it were disappearing, coming into view again, disappearing, coming into view again-that is to say, it really always is between being and not being. And that is what one wants to copy."

-Attributed to Cézanne by Joachim Gasquet


The origins of this project are sketchbook drawings of seagulls made on a boat in open water. As the seagulls fly overhead, it’s only possible to get down a few essential lines. The drawings are minimal, consisting of only broad gestures: evidence of the perception of the birds’ anatomy and flightpath, before the moment is gone. This plein air mode of working is a chance to explore the very real distinction between reality and observation: a kind of perceptual slipperiness. The resulting paintings were made in the studio, and are a composite of these observational gesture drawings from the sketchbook, the memories of trying to capture a fleeting event, imagination and improvisation.

In conjunction with the installation of the paintings, a “sketch” for an augmented reality piece, produced in collaboration with Jonathan Ehrenberg, can be seen as a short video clip here.